Archive for December, 2012

Weibel, “Blind in a Land of Visionaries”

December 29, 2012

Weibel, Deana. 2012. Blind in a Land of Visionaries: When a Non-Pilgrim Studies Pilgrimage. In Missionary Impositions: Conversion, Resistance, and Other Challenges to Objectivity, eds. Hillary K. Crane and Deana Weibel. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

Wiegele, “Silence, Betrayal, and Becoming”

December 29, 2012

Wiegele, Katharine L. 2012. Silence, Betrayal, and Becoming within the Interpretive Gap of Participant Observation. In Missionary Impositions: Conversion, Resistance, and Other Challenges to Objectivity in Religious Ethnography, eds. Hillary K. Crane and Deana Weibel. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

DiCarlo, “Observations from the Back Pew”

December 29, 2012

DiCarlo, Lisa. 2012. I’m Just a Soul Whose Intentions are Good: Observations from the Back Pew. In Missionary Impositions: Conversion, Resistance, and Other Challenges to Objectivity in Religious Research, eds. Hillary K. Crane and Deana Weibel. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

Bielo, “Writing Religion”

December 29, 2012

Bielo, James S. 2012. Writing Religion. In Missionary Impositions: Conversion, Resistance, and Other Challenges to Objectivity in Religious Ethnography, eds. Hillary K. Crane and Deana Weibel. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

Tremlett, “Two shock doctrines”

December 19, 2012

Tremlett, Paul-Francois.  2012.  Two shock doctrines: From Christo-disciplinary to neoliberal urbanisms in the Philippines.  Culture and Religion 13(4): 405-423.

Abstract:  In this essay, I contrast two moments of shock to open Christianity in the Philippines to a spatial analysis. I begin by framing the Spanish colonial period and the Christianisation of the Philippines as a spatial shock. The Philippines was spatially transformed through colonial projects such as urbanism, intensive agriculture and resource extraction that, taken together, can be understood in the first instance as processes of unmapping, where environments once alive and animated by meaningful relations between peoples and places were reconfigured as empty, and in the second instance as the instantiation of a new sensorium with profound consequences for how Filipinos would, thereafter, experience the world. I dwell initially on Spanish urban practices and the optical power of the planned town as the emplacement of a Christo-disciplinary sensorium that rendered local populations legible and visible to colonial power, generating new types, compositions and combinations of subjects and establishing new points of coordination for Filipino bodies and minds. I then move ‘forward’ in time to consider a second and rather more contemporary spatial shock. Here, the organising logic of the Christo-disciplinary sensorium is under threat as a new urban morphology and a new mobile religiosity mark the emergence of a new, neoliberal sensorium.

Brickell, “Geographies of Contemporary Christian Mission(aries)”

December 19, 2012

Brickell, Claire.  2012.  Geographies of Contemporary Christian Mission(aries).  Geography Compass 6(12): 725–739.

Abstract: This paper draws together emerging literature within Geography, and from across the broader social sciences, around contemporary mission and missionaries. It argues for the importance of recognising mission organisations and missionaries not just as historic relics, but as important, active, and geographically far ranging actors in the modern world. In mapping out the little work that has been conducted, three themes are addressed, missionary geopolitics; mission, welfare and development; and transnational migration, religion and cosmopolitanism. The article highlights the potential contributions that a (re)examination of missionary lives, beliefs and praxis can make to these disparate bodies of literature, and calls for further research in these directions within geographical scholarship.

Cimino et al. “Ecologies of Faith in New York City”

December 19, 2012

Cimino, Richard; Nadia A. Mian; and Weishan Huang, eds.  2013. Ecologies of Faith in New York City: The Evolution of Religious Institutions.  Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Publisher’s Description: Ecologies of Faith in New York City examines patterns of interreligious cooperation and conflict in New York City. It explores how representative congregations in this religiously diverse city interact with their surroundings by competing for members, seeking out niches, or cooperating via coalitions and neighborhood organizations. Based on in-depth research in New York’s ethnically mixed and rapidly changing neighborhoods, the essays in the volume describe how religious institutions shape and are shaped by their environments, what new roles they have assumed, and how they relate to other religious groups in the community.

Chapters of Interest:

Filling Niches and Pews in Williamsburg and Greenpoint: The Religious Ecology of Gentrification \ Richard Cimino

Korean American Churches and the Negotiation of Space in Flushing, Queens \ Keun-Joo Christine Pae

Diversity and Competition: Politics and Conflict in New Immigrant Communities \ Weishan Huang

The Brazilianization of New York City: Brazilian Immigrants and Evangelical Churches in a Pluralized Urban Landscape \ Donizete Rodrigues

Building and Expanding Communities: African Immigrant Congregations and the Challenge of Diversity \ Moses Biney

Changing Lives One Scoop at a Time: The Creation of Alphabet Scoop on the Lower East Side \ Sheila P. Johnson

Navigating Property Development through a Framework of Religious Ecology: The Case of Trinity Lutheran Church \ Nadia A. Mian

Rodemeier, “Everyone is a potential leader”

December 19, 2012

Rodemeier, Susanne.  2012.  “Everyone is a potential leader” – attractiveness of a charismatic Church in Solo, Java (Indonesia).  Ekonomia 3(20)/2012: 45-58.

Abstract:  The evangelical-charismatic Family of God Church (GBI-KA: Gereja Bethel Indonesia – Keluarga Allah) was founded in the Javanese town of Solo and is currently booming, especially in predominantly Muslim surroundings. The reason why so many Christians prefer specifically this church over several other churches in town is still unknown. After doing ethnographic field research in 2011, I suggest that the reasons for its boom are not so much the economy or successful business relations, as was perhaps the case up tol five years ago. To prove my findings, I will take a closer look at the Family of God Church’s economic and social system as well as its internal structure. It is quite obvious that this church, like many other churches, fills a gap in Indonesian social politics. But what is different about the Family of God Church is its inner cell-structure, which sees everyone as a potential leader. This structure picks up the idea of the International Charismatic Mission Church (ICMC) of G12 cell churches. The idea is to build an endlessly growing organism of cells and then add a spiritual component by organising these cells in groups of twelve to evoke the idea of Jesus and his twelve apostles. Next to the attractive spiritual component, this organisational structure stands out in contrast to the Javanese traditional social system as it offers individuals the chance to move up the hierarchical ladder. Furthermore, the masses of the fast growing population are broken down into small groups who share the same aim, i.e. to experience Jesus or to be “born again” (melahirkan kembali), as they call it.

Walker Peterson, “A Non-Place Identity and a Fixed (Sacred) Text”

December 19, 2012

Walker Peterson, Heather.  2012.  A Non-Place Identity and a Fixed (Sacred) Text: Literacy Practices Shaping Identity/ies of a Slavic Baptist Congregation from the Former Soviet Union to the United States.  Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism, 12(3): 450–465.

Abstract: Based on an interdisciplinary linguistic ethnography, I apply the term ‘non-place’ to the collective identity of a Slavic migrant congregation in the United States. Those members socialised into their faith before migration had already been marginalised in their resistance to the former national Soviet identity. The New Literacy Studies in particular help to describe their historic Protestant literacy practices regarding a sacred, and thus fixed, text. A fixed sacred text provided the freedom to interpret the group’s context, a perceived narrative to join, and authority for leadership to dictate a way of life. Events around text were warm and welcoming, utilising Western texts for legitimatised scripture interpretation, and accessible to both Russian speakers and second-generation English speakers. With the assumed permanence of a sacred text, new believers retold their own narratives as part of the scriptural one, and had a ‘home land’ they had never stepped foot in.

Blanes “Moral circumscriptions”

December 19, 2012

Blanes, Ruy Llera.  2012.  Moral circumscriptions: involuntary mobility, diaspora and ideological configurations in the Angolan Tokoist church.  Canadian Journal of African Studies, 46(3): 367-380.

Abstract: This article proposes to debate the relationship between mobility, faith and belonging, exploring the idea of “moral circumscriptions” to describe how one particular African Christian movement, the Tokoist church, experienced a historical process of territorial transcendence, from a regional, ethnic movement to a global venture, responding with a complex set of ideologies attached to ideas of place. The article highlights the – often tense and conflictual – political and ideological processes of identitary construction developed within the church.

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