Archive for March, 2013

Thomas, “Women in Lebanon”

March 29, 2013

Thomas, Marie-Claude. 2013. Women in Lebanon: Living with Christianity, Islam, and Multiculturalism. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Publisher’s Description: Combining insider and outsider perspectives, Women in Lebanon looks at Christian and Muslim women living together in a multicultural society and facing modernity. While the Arab Spring has begun to draw attention to issues of change, modernity, and women’s subjectivity, this manuscript takes a unique approach to examining and describing the Lebanese “alternative modernities” thesis and how it has shaped thinking about the meaning of terms like evolution, progress, development, history, and politics in contemporary Arab thought. The author draws on extensive ethnographic research, as well as her own personal experience.

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Probasco, “Giving Time, Not Money”

March 29, 2013

Probasco, LiErin. 2013. Giving Time, Not Money: Long-Term Impacts of Short-Term Mission Trips. Missiology 41(2):202-224.

Abstract: This article expands current knowledge of the impact that brief but intense religious experiences can have on routine behavior by examining the long-term effects of short-term mission travel on both volunteering and charitable giving. Existing literature addresses only the first few years after travel. Using data from the 2005 Religion and Global Issues Survey, I examine how participation in a domestic or international religious mission trip in high school influences adults’ volunteering and giving behavior. I also consider alternate explanations that may account for the relationship between high school mission-trip participation and current giving or volunteering, including demographic factors, religious beliefs and practices, and other forms of civic engagement. I find adolescent participation in a domestic short-term mission trip has a significant, positive influence on the likelihood of volunteering for either a local or an internationally focused organization as an adult. In contrast, adolescent participation in a domestic mission trip has a significant dampening effect on charitable giving to secular organizations. I find no significant associations between international high school trips and adult volunteering and giving when additional factors are taken into account. I discuss the implications of these results for the ways church leaders and scholars think about the mechanisms through which brief, transformative religious experiences influence beliefs and behavior over the course of a lifetime.

Hancock, “Encountering Islam”

March 29, 2013

Hancock, Mary. 2013. Encountering Islam in Short-Term Mission.” Missiology 41(2):187-201.

Abstract: This article documents short-term mission’s engagement with Islam by showing how Islam is represented by sending agencies and how volunteers interact with Muslims. I relate the different styles of representing and engaging with Islam to differences of theological orientation as well as to the particular contexts and practices of short-term mission. This article is based on research in Southern California between 2009 and 2012, including visual and textual content analyses of sending agencies’ websites and guidebooks, and interviews with 57 short-term mission participants

Kostarelos, “Short-Term Missions in the Orthodox Church”

March 29, 2013

Kostarelos, Frances. 2013. Short-Term Missions in the Orthodox Church in North America. Missiology 41(2):179-186.

Abstract: This article examines beliefs, institutions, and social changes shaping short-term missions in the Orthodox Church. It directs attention to key theological principles guiding short-term missions. The article provides a descriptive account of short-term mission activity informed by Orthodox perspective. It frames questions to guide future study of short-term missions in the Orthodox Church.

Farrell, “Short-Term Mission to Global Discipleship”

March 29, 2013

Farrell, B. Hunter. 2013. From Short-Term Mission to Global Discipleship: A Peruvian Case Study. Missiology 41(2):163-178.

Abstract: This article is a case study of how short-term missions in Peru were transformed into long-term involvement in a way that contributed to the transformation of the host community, the missioners, and their understanding of God’s mission. A complex environmental conflict in a highly polluted city in the Andes Mountains provided the context where a Christian mission network engaged more than 90 U.S. and 40 Peruvian Christians to transform short-term missions into a platform for long-term engagement and peaceful change.

Moodie, “Inequality and Intimacy”

March 29, 2013

Moodie, Ellen. 2013. Inequality and Intimacy between Sister Communities in El Salvador and the United States. Missiology 41(2):146-162.

Abstract: In this article I consider the desires of participants in a particular sister-community relationship. I suggest that experiences of Illinois parishioners who have been visiting, and assisting, rural Salvadorans over the past 20 years may help us to understand both the possibilities and the limits of such encounters. I probe the limits by examining an incident that took place in July 2010. In thinking through my discomfort with a request for money, in the context of a larger history of global relationships and the ethics of such missions, I have come to believe that the disparities between the visitors and visited—economic, geographic, cultural, political—is not something to overcome. Rather, these differences are necessary for sister-community relationships.

Zehner, “Short-Term Missions”

March 29, 2013

Zehner, Edwin. 2013. Short-Term Missions: Some Perspectives from Thailand. Missiology 41(2):13-145.

Abstract: Recent interviews with congregational leaders in Thailand suggest a need for reframing some of the concerns commonly expressed in missiological writing on short-term missions (STM). North American writers have expressed concern about the ministerial inefficiency of short-term missions, the attendant de-professionalization of foreign missions, and the potential for STM to encourage dependency among recipients. Interviews with Thai pastors in 2007 revealed a different set of concerns. Many expressed an interest in resourcing for stronger congregational life, a concern that is usually missing from North American writing on short-term missions. Short-term missions were also valued most greatly by leaders whose congregations did not have alternative access to the material and relational resources made available by the visitors. Finally, in contrast to concerns that short-term missions promote dependency, the interviews suggest that many Thai leaders were using the relational networks to access moral and material resources that enhanced ministerial vitality and independence.

Priest and Howell, “Theme Issue on Short-Term Missions”

March 29, 2013

Priest, Robert J. and Brian M. Howell. 2013. Introduction: Theme Issue on Short-Term Missions. Missiology 41(2): 124-129.

Abstract: Like the anthropology of tourism, research on short-term missions has had to overcome a bias against what is often assumed to be a trivial phenomenon. As scholars in a variety of fields have encountered this growing, global phenomenon, they have begun to develop a vibrant and multifaceted research-based literature exploring its cultural, historic, economic, and political aspects. This introduction to a special issue of Missiology on short-term missions presents a brief overview of the development of this emerging literature, as well as synopses of the six articles advancing our understanding of short-term missions.

Burdick, “The Color of Sound”

March 25, 2013

Burdick, John. 2013. The Color of Sound: Race, Religion, and Music in Brazil. New York: NYU Press.

Publisher’s Description: Throughout Brazil, Afro-Brazilians face widespread racial prejudice. Many turn to religion, with Afro-Brazilians disproportionately represented among Protestants, the fastest-growing religious group in the country. Officially, Brazilian Protestants do not involve themselves in racial politics. Behind the scenes, however, the community is deeply involved in the formation of different kinds of blackness—and its engagement in racial politics is rooted in the major new cultural movement of black music.

In this highly original account, anthropologist John Burdick explores the complex ideas about race, racism, and racial identity that have grown up among Afro-Brazilians in the black music scene. By immersing himself for nearly a year in the vibrant worlds of black gospel, gospel rap, and gospel samba, Burdick pushes our understanding of racial identity and the social effects of music in new directions. Delving into the everyday music-making practices of these scenes, Burdick shows how the creative process itself shapes how Afro-Brazilian artists experience and understand their racial identities. This deeply detailed, engaging portrait challenges much of what we thought we knew about Brazil’s Protestants,provoking us to think in new ways about their role in their country’s struggle to combat racism.

van de Kamp, “Public counselling”

March 24, 2013

van de Kamp, Linda.  2013.  Public counselling: Brazilian Pentecostal intimate performances among urban women in Mozambique.  Culture, Health & Sexuality, advanced online publication.

Abstract: Analysing the public character of Brazilian Pentecostal counselling sessions in urban Mozambique, this paper aims to examine the configurations of exposure through which counselling acquires and produces sociocultural forms of intimacy. During ‘therapy of love’ sessions held by the Brazilian Universal Church of the Kingdom of God, strict bodily acts need to be performed publicly to authorise love. Drawing on the notion of religious habitus, the paper focuses on how the performativity of Brazilian Pentecostal counselling practices responds to and shapes a public culture of love and intimacy among upwardly mobile women in urban Mozambique, and how the performative scripts converts carry out during therapy result in ambiguous relationships.

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