Posts Tagged ‘Democracy’

Woodberry, “Pentecostalism and Democracy”

June 12, 2013

Woodberry, Robert D. 2013. Pentecostalism and Democracy: Is There a Relationship? In Spirit and Power: The Growth and Global Impact of Pentecostalism, Donald E. Miller, Kimon H. Sargeant, and Richard Flory, eds, 119-142. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

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Lindhardt, “Pentecostalism and politics in neoliberal Chile”

February 27, 2013

Lindhardt, Martin. 2012. Pentecostalism and politics in neoliberal Chile. Ibero Americana (Stockholm) 42(1-2): 59-84. 

Abstract: This article explores historical and contemporary relationships between Pentecostalism and politics in Chile. The first part of the article provides an historical account of the growth and consolidation of Pentecostal religion within changing political environments and sheds light on Pentecostal stances to and involvements with the political sphere. In particular, it focuses on how a culture of political disenchantment has emerged in post- dictatorial neo-liberal Chile, creating a symbolic void that can be filled by religious movements. The second part of the article discusses possible affinities between Pentecostalism as a religious culture and democratic principles and values. It argues that although Pentecostalism may contain certain democratic qualities, there is also a striking compatibility between, on the one hand, Pentecostal theistic understandings of politics and social change, and, on the other, a neo-liberal social order, where political apathy is widespread and where a privatised rather than a communal and associative sense of progress predominates

Woodberry “The Missionary Roots of Liberal Democracy”

June 7, 2012

Robert D. Woodberry. 2012. The Missionary Roots of Liberal Democracy. American Political Science Review 106 (2): 244-274.

Abstract:

This article demonstrates historically and statistically that conversionary Protestants (CPs) heavily influenced the rise and spread of stable democracy around the world. It argues that CPs were a crucial catalyst initiating the development and spread of religious liberty, mass education, mass printing, newspapers, voluntary organizations, and colonial reforms, thereby creating the conditions that made stable democracy more likely. Statistically, the historic prevalence of Protestant missionaries explains about half the variation in democracy in Africa, Asia, Latin America and Oceania and removes the impact of most variables that dominate current statistical research about democracy. The association between Protestant missions and democracy is consistent in different continents and subsamples, and it is robust to more than 50 controls and to instrumental variable analyses.

Fediakova, “Evangelicals in Democratic Chile”

April 12, 2012

Fediakova, Evguenia. 2012. Evangelicals in Democratic Chile, 1990-2008: from ‘resistance identity’ to ‘project identity.’ Religion, State, and Society 40(1): 24-48.

Abstract: Since the reestablishment of democracy in Chile, Evangelicals have been becoming more prominent in society. Their communities foster civic skills among their members, and this fact, taken together with the gradual raising of their economic and educational level, could transform the Evangelicals into a ‘cultural citizenship’. Nevertheless, my study project shows that in spite of the extensive community work that Evangelical churches are developing, and their respect for democracy, they continue to be depoliticised and distanced from the main national problems. The Evangelical community is concerned about its rights, but it tends to act in defence of its corporate interests rather than in the national perspective, which decreases its involvement in the developing democracy.

Smilde and Pagan, “Christianity and Politics in Venezuela”

October 5, 2011

Smilde, David and Coraly Pagan. 2011. Christianity and Politics in Venezuela’s Bolivarian Democracy: Catholics, Evangelicals and Political Polarization. In Venezuela’s Bolivarian Democracy: Participation, Politics, and Culture Under Chavez. Edited by, David Smilde and Daniel Hellinger. pp. 317-341. Durham: Duke University Press.

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