Posts Tagged ‘Simon Coleman’

Farhadian, “Introducing World Christianity”

December 4, 2011

Farhadian, Charles E.  (2012) Introducing World Christianity. Madden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.

Publisher’s Description: This interdisciplinary introduction offers students a truly global overview of the worldwide spread and impact of Christianity. It is enriched throughout by detailed historic and ethnographic material, showing how broad themes within Christianity have been adopted and adapted by Christian denominations within each major region of the world.

  • Provides a comprehensive overview of the spread and impact of world Christianity
  • Contains studies from every major region of the world, including Africa, Asia, Latin America, the North Atlantic, and Oceania
  • Brings together an international team of contributors from history, sociology, and anthropology, as well as religious studies
  • Examines the significant social, cultural, and political transformations in contemporary societies brought about through the influence of Christianity
  • Takes a non-theological approach, focusing instead on the impact of and response to Christianity
  • Discusses Protestant, Evangelical, Catholic, and Orthodox forms of the faith
  • Features useful maps and illustrations
  • Combines broader discussions with detailed regional analysis, creating an invaluable introduction to world Christianity

This is an engaging multidisciplinary introduction to the worldwide spread and impact of Christianity. Bringing together chapters from leading scholars in history, sociology, anthropology, and religious studies, this book examines the major transformations in contemporary societies brought about through the influence of Christianity.

Each chapter shows how the broad themes within Christianity have been adopted and adapted by Christian denominations within each major region of the world. In this way, the book paints a global picture of the impact of Christianity, enriched by detailed historic and ethnographic material for each particular region. Throughout, the chapters examine Protestant, Evangelical, Catholic and Orthodox forms of Christianity. The combination of broader perspectives and deep analysis of particular regions, illuminating the social, cultural, political, and religious features of changes brought about by Christianity, makes this book essential reading for students of world Christianity.

Coleman, “Prosperity Unbound? Debating the “Sacrificial Economy” ”

November 15, 2011

Coleman, Simon (2011) “Prosperity Unbound? Debating the ‘Sacrificial Economy'” Research in Economic Anthropology 31:3-45

Abstract: I present here a review and critique of social scientific analyses of the global spread of Prosperity Christianity. My argument is that at least two phases of research can be discerned: an initial phase where economic factors are given strong causal explanatory force in accounting for the upsurge in Health and Wealth congregations; and a more recent phase that complicates our understandings of the relationships between religious and economic action. My review of the literature reveals that sacrifice is a theoretical trope common to both phases of writing, and in the latter half of the chapter I explore the ways in which notions of the sacrificial economy can point to nuanced understandings of the forms of materiality deployed in many Prosperity contexts. The wider implications of this chapter refer in part to how we might understand notions of rational and irrational action in relation to economic behavior; and also to an appreciation of the ways in which ritual action can be productive of, and not merely a response to, perceived ambiguity and risk.

Maier & Coleman, “Who Will Tend the Vine?”

October 18, 2011

Maier, Katrin and Coleman, Simon (2011) ‘Who Will Tend the Vine? Pentecostalism, Parenting and the Role of the State in “London-Lago”‘  Journal of Religion in Europe 4(3):450-470 

Abstract: We explore the tensions evident among Nigerian Pentecostals in London between social and ideological insularity on the one hand, and a more outward-oriented, expansive orientation on the other. Analysis of these stances is complemented by the exploration of believers’ actions within a material but also metaphorical arena that we term “London-Lagos.“ Such themes are developed specifically through a focus on believers’ relations with Nigerian and British state systems in relation to child-rearing—an activity that renders parents sometimes dangerously visible to apparatuses of the state but also raises key dilemmas concerning the proper and moral location of socialisation into Christian values. We show how such dilemmas are embodied in a play, written by a Nigerian Pentecostalist, termed “The Vine-Keepers.“

Coleman, “Actors of History?”

October 9, 2011

Coleman, Simon. 2011. Actors of History? Religion, Politics, and “Reality” within the Protestant Right in America. In Religion, Politics, and Globalization: Anthropological Approaches. Edited by Galina Lindquist and Don Handelman. New York and Oxford: Berghahn.

From the first paragraph: “To a supposedly secular Europe, and even to skeptical anthropologists, the confluence of religion and politics in America remains a source of bemusement. Yet it shows no sign of disappearing – rather the reverse. In this chapter I expire the past and present of what has become the Christian, and more specifically the Protestant, Right in the United States . . . I hope to thereby capture some of the ways in which an over-hasty conflation of secularity with modernity cannot begin to deal with the ambiguities and accommodations involved in the expression of religious commitment within contemporary political, legal, and social arenas in the United States.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lindhardt (ed.), “Practicing the Faith”

October 5, 2011

Lindhardt, Martin (ed.) 2011. Practicing the Faith: The Ritual Life of Pentecostal-Charismatic Christians. New York and Oxford: Berghahn.

Publisher’s Description: Over the past decades, Pentecostal-charismatic Christianity has arguably become the fastest growing religious movement in the world. Distinguishing features of this variant of Christianity include formal ritual activities as well as informal, experiential, and ecstatic forms of worship. This book examines Pentecostal-charismatic ritual practice in different parts of the world, highlighting, among other things, the crucial role of ritual in creating religious communities and identities.

Contributors: Martin Lindhardt, Joel Robbins, Jacqueline Ryle, Kelly Chong, Thomas J. Csordas, Martyn Percy, Paul Gifford, Simon Coleman, Jon Bialecki, Gretchen Pfeil, David Smilde

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